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TOPIC: Fox steering tie-rod guard

Fox steering tie-rod guard 1 week 6 hours ago #57632

Hi guys,
I was wondering what's so special about the Fox tie rods that it requires these alu tie-rod guards?

Why have these guards not been used on any other model?

Thanks
MetalMaxx
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Fox steering tie-rod guard 1 week 5 hours ago #57637

From memory the steering rods are quite long, low and exposed, maybe they kept getting knocked & the balljoints separating in development? Typical Tamiya suspension IMO, if it doesn't work, keep adding more complexity & weight ;)
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Fox steering tie-rod guard 1 week 5 hours ago #57638

Big smile on your conclusion , thanks for your input, much appreciated.

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Fox steering tie-rod guard 6 days 16 hours ago #57646

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I had thought that the guards weren’t so much to stop the rods getting hit as to be a stop preventing a hit to the inner wheel on full lock from pushing the tie rod/upright joint “over-centre” and then leaving the steering stuck beyond full lock. (Once the joint is the wrong way, when the servo pushes to try to straighten up, it’ll actually be trying to push even more lock on)

If I’m right, I’m not sure why only the Fox needed it. Long rods, perhaps the servo is a bit further back or something? Reasonable tight lock. Whatever combination, I guess it meant that the tie rod and the trailing steering arm on the upright were closer to a straight line on full lock than most cars, so more vulnerable to a hit to the wheel pushing it to, and then beyond, a straight line.

Having said that, my whole childhood I assumed it was to protect against direct hits to the rod. And it could still be that!

Just thinking now, I guess it was one of their first cars with ball joint suspension, and so no easy way to give a physical end stop to the wheel’s steering angle. Their earlier kingpin type designs would easily allow the upright to hit part of its carrier and provide an endstop.
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